Breaking Berkeley is in deep trouble, a lawsuit has just been filed

Support Conservative News and my Ministry Here at PayPal
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_donations&business=VJMDKA4LRULS8&lc=US&item_name=End%20Times%20Prophecy%20News&currency_code=USD&bn=PP%2dDonationsBF%3abtn_donateCC_LG%2egif%3aNonHosted

My Website-www.endtimesprophecynews.org
My New Website which is almost done-www.brotherbeckwith.com
Buy some awesome Natural Food Supplements to stop Cancer and many other Poisons from Natural News-

KJV BIBLE BELIEVER 1 Peter 1:23 Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever. Psalms 68:11 The Lord gave the word: great was the company of those that published it. 1611 KJV Proverbs 30:5-6 Every word of God is pure: he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him. Add thou not unto his words, lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar. Psalms 12:6 The words of the LORD are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times. 1604 to 1611 KJV completed in 7 years! James 1:21-22, 25 Wherefore lay apart all filthiness and superfluity of naughtiness, and receive with meekness the engrafted word, which is able to save your souls. But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed. GOD BLESS

Breaking: Berkeley is in deep trouble, a lawsuit has just been filed
http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=75456
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2syzMZYL9R7NFZ3S2x2OUtsWlE/view

BREAKING: Trump Takes Major Action On Syria!
http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=75457
https://apnews.com/748d01c97c894294af485f4c7ac52a00

Look What We Just Learned About Aaron Hernandez’s Prison Lover!!
http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=75458

Wow! Everyone Is Asking DNC Chairman Tom Perez To Stop Swearing
http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=75459

BREAKING: French Antifa Protests Escalate In Wake Of Election, And It’s Really Bad
http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=75460
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/04/24/french-presidential-election-leftist-protesters-grow-violent-after-results-come-in.html
Video Rating: / 5

Cool Just Filed Lawsuits images

Check out these just filed lawsuits images:

James Dyson
just filed lawsuits
Image by Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer
Sir James Dyson puts on Dyson product launch with a difference: Sydney, Australia…

Sir James Dyson, the British billionaire industrial designer (not to be confused with Tony Stark from Iron Man – Marvel Comics fame) who invented the dual cyclone bagless vacuum cleaner, has just finished hosting his fabulous launch event at the Sydney Theatre Co Ltd, Pier 4.

It’s understood he took a fair swipe at "competitor) robot vacuums as "pathetic" with poor suction and no navigating skills. Yes, the others suck – but not in a good way.

A lot of the (product) attention was on his latest product, a tap that can also dry your hands in about 12 seconds. Dyson, who rocketed his company to nearly 4000 staff and .5 billion in annual sales, advised he would only launch a robot vacuum when he got it right.

New product snapshot – the Dyson hybrid dryer-tap…

Robot models launched in Australia recently include the 9 Robomaid, LG’s Roboking range (9-49) and Samsung’s 9 Navibot. Dyson didn’t name and shame but was dismissive of the current lot, criticising their navigation and efficiency which meant they offered poor battery performance and cleaning ability.

"They’ve got whiskers sticking out of them – whiskers don’t clean anything they just disturb the birds," he told Fairfax Media.

"It’s a difficult job and I’m not rushing out a gimmick robot to pretend to people we’re cleaning the floor, we’re not doing that we’re doing it properly."

Robomaid is one of the robot vacuums on the market.

Despite coming up with his vacuum cleaner breakthrough in the late 1970s, it only reached the British market 10 years later, and Dyson is now a global market leader. A third of British homes now have a Dyson.

The company has also launched other innovations such as bladeless fans and an "Airblade" hand dryer that uses jets of air to scrape the water off the hands. The same sort of technology but with a far more advanced motor ("three times faster than any electric motor has gone before") powers the new hybrid dryer-taps.

Dyson has wrestled for years to prevent companies copying his designs, winning a million damages award from Hoover in 2000. Now, the main offenders are out of Asia and Dyson thinks intellectual property protection is weaker because people are getting away with copying.

"Koreans and the Chinese are copying things and I think it’s very bad," he said. "It’s said by certain people that that increases competition, actually it decreases competition because all they’re doing is copying the market leader."

He said the copycat companies could produce cheaper products because they haven’t incurred all the development costs and associated risks.

"It’s morally wrong, I think it’s legally wrong and I think it hurts the consumers because the consumer doesn’t get a choice," he said. "Intellectual property should be supported better; the law should be made stronger."

In October last year Dyson filed a lawsuit alleging a "spy" employee stole the blueprints to a £100 million (9.7 million) technology and passed them to rival Bosch.

Dyson said western countries such as Australia and Britain need to focus on educating more scientists and engineers, as they are increasingly being overtaken by countries in Asia.

"40 per cent of all graduates from Singapore are engineers," he said. "For Britain, Australia, the US and other European countries to compete in any way they’ve got to heavily arm themselves with technology."

Classy event in Sydney…

It wasn’t a cheap and nasty event, as is too often the case with product launches. Dyson impressed with wit, goodwill and loads of great food and drinks, which looked and tasted 5 star. It was a great vibe and news media was treated with respect, friendliness and delicious treats. How could we not share the story and photos far and wide across media and internet – which was no doubt another masterstroke by the colourful billionaire and his brains trust. If you have the budget – Dysons’ are well worth a close look.

Websites

Dyson Australia
www.dyson.com.au

Eva Rinaldi Photography
www.evarinaldi.com

Hispanic Heritage Month Observance
just filed lawsuits
Image by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Mendez family championed end of educational segregation in California

LOS ANGELES — With the theme “many backgrounds, many stories,” the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District closed out Hispanic Heritage Month Oct. 13 at the District headquarters by hearing a first-hand account of a historic journey.

Sylvia Mendez was just 8 years old in 1943 when she and her brothers were denied enrollment in the Westminster School District in Orange County. At the time, roughly 80 percent of California school districts were segregated.

Sylvia’s father, Gonzalo, tried reasoning with the principal, the school board and finally the school district, to no-avail. He and other parents organized protests demanding an end to the segregation, ultimately filing the lawsuit.

They won their case in 1946, but the school district appealed. On April 14, 1947 the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the decision and California Governor Earl Warren signed a law repealing the state’s remaining school segregation statutes on June 14, 1947.

“Mendez v. Westminster School District was the precedent for Brown v. Board of Education,” said Mendez. “Seven years before the rest of the nation, California was integrated.”

The Brown v. Board of Education case in 1954 does not mention the Mendez case, but it is no coincidence that two of the key players in both cases were Warren, by then Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, and Thurgood Marshall, the chief counsel for the NAACP in both cases.

“As she became very sick, my mother would say, ‘nobody knows about this case and that California was the first state to be integrated, seven years before the rest of the nation’ and that’s when I promised my mother I would go around the country and talk about Mendez v. Westminster,” said Mendez.

Her mother, Felicitas, died in 1998 and Mendez has kept her promise, championing the family’s story.

Mendez’s passion has been recognized in California and around the country. Two public schools are currently named after her parents. In 2007, a U.S. Postage stamp marked the 60th anniversary of the case and on Feb. 15, 2011, President Barack Obama presented Mendez with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. With it, she once again joins Warren and Marshall.

“I talk to our folks a lot about passion in what they are doing; I see the passion in your eyes in what you are doing,” said District Commander Col. Mark Toy. “If we could all do that, it would be amazing.”

(USACE photo by Richard Rivera)

Cool Just Filed Lawsuits images

Check out these just filed lawsuits images:

Roddy McDowall, Richard Burton, Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Roddy McDowall, Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Martin Landau, Richard Burton, Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Cool Just Filed images

A few nice just filed images I found:

The Morning Bells
just filed
Image by mattsantomarco
The Maroon Bells in Aspen, Colorado.

Could you believe that I was the only person here to see this in person? I couldn’t either! At the Maroon Bells no less! Last time I was here was for the fall colors and there was at least three dozen other photographers squeezed in between one another. It was just me, my gear and a heck of a view. And even better I had some great clouds that morning which produced some stellar drama and color in the sky. The Maroon Bells during its prime fall colors can’t be beat, but I thought this summer shot provided a slightly different atmosphere than you typically see from the area.

SHOT DETAILS:
3 shot exposure blend of (-2) and (0) brackets including a tone mapped file. Various curves adjustments, white balance tweaks and sharpening.

Blog: Maroon Bells Sunrise
Facebook Fan Page

Nice Just Filed photos

Check out these just filed images:

SPCM Snowy Sunset – Heavily Tonemapped
just filed
Image by bbusschots
Dramatic red clouds just after sunset add a dramatic backdrop to a view of St. Joseph’s Square on the S. Patrick’s College Campus (AKA NUI Maynooth South Campus) in Maynooth, Ireland.

This is one of three versions, this one is heavily tonemapped. The tonemapping was done on a single RAW file using Photomatix Pro.

This shot featured on my blog as Photo of the Week 52 – Fire & Ice.

Note – I re-mastered this shot in 2012 to remove some of the annoying colour casts on it. You can find the remastered version here.

Nice Just Filed photos

Check out these just filed images:

Ashley on Whitefish Island
just filed
Image by Billy Wilson Photography
© Billy Wilson 2010

Flickr has suspended my account, so I cannot interact with people on here anymore until they lift the suspension. They claim that I add so many favorites that it is considered an abuse of resources. I am hoping to convince them to lift this suspension. All of my images have been knocked out of Explore and the Flickr search engine. I am unable to favorite or comment on anyone’s photos. I am not the only one who has had this happen to them lately. They also accused me of using a script or automated process to fave other member’s images, which isn’t true, I don’t even know how to use a script or even what one is! I personally fave every image that you see in my favorites stream.

A point I would like to make is, dispite whether you think excessive faving manually is right or wrong, it was never stated that there was a limit of the number of faves you can make or how many you can make per unit of time. Even in Flickr’s FAQ it states "There is no limit on the number of favorites you can have." So, they are saying that I violated Flickr’s Terms of Service and Community Guidelines, even though I never violated anything explicitly stated there. Hence, they are punishing me for something that they never even cited as an offence to Flickr’s Terms of Service and Community Guidelines.

UPDATE I just got a message saying that the suspension on my account will be lifted!
___________________________________________________________________

A shot of Ashley sitting along the boardwalk on Whitefish Island. This is Ashley, I met her on Model Mayhem, her Model Mayhem number is 1216213.

About the Photo
*Camera: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XS *Lens: EF 50mm ƒ/1.8 II *Shutter Speed: 1/15 Sec. *Aperture Value: ƒ/5.6 *ISO: 100 *Focal Length 50mm (80mm Equvalent in 35mm Film)

I shot this on a tripod using mirror lockup and a remote switch. Ashley was sitting on the edge of the boardwalk during this pose.

To the right of the camera I had a Canon Speedlite 430EX II at full power pointed towards her about 3 feet away. To the left of the camera I had a Vivitar flash at full power being diffused by a cloth. I had someone hold the Vivitar flash out over the water while on the light stand to help provide wrap around light coming from behind the model to help separate her from the background. The Speedlite was triggered by a Canon ST-E2 wireless Speedlite transmitter and the Vivitar flash was triggered optically.

I opened the RAW file in ACR and added tone mapping effects to the image by increasing the clarity multiple times using the spot adjustment brush and the basic panel. To give these effects I also increased the recovery, fill light, and blacks sliders to recover detail. I manipulated the tone curve to keep the luminance in the image balanced. I also adjusted the hue and saturation of each colour individually.

I opened the RAW file in CS4 and saved it as a 16 bit TIFF and continued to edit the file. I placed it on the original unedited image and changed the blend mode to luminousity so I could avoid the weird HDR colours that come from tone mapping. I added a mask to the tone mapped image and removed the detail enhancements from some pieces to make the image look better. To increase the detail enhancements on the clothing I did some dodging and burning to give it a more contrasty look.

I used the sponge tool to saturate certain parts of the image like the reflection in the water. I softened the light on the model by using healing tools to remove the hard edge. I used the tools in liquify to slightly change the shape of some of the features on her face. I used the dodge and burn tools to make the eyes stand out more and used the brush tool on a layer set to blend mode color to paint the eyes a bluer colour. At the end I saved a 16 bit TIFF file, converted to sRGB colourspace and saved as a JPEG to upload to the internet.

Looks Great Large on Black!

This Lawsuit Just May Be The Most Ridiculous One Filed In American History…

Source:
https://www.spreaker.com/user/usaradio/trending-today-usa-08-17-16-part-2

A couple in Michigan is suing Nintendo, saying Pokemon Go is making them miserable. A man who changed the face of political commentary on television has died. And we have a Trending Today roundtable. Guests: Loretta Powers, Jason Wert, Ryan Mauro, Chris Agee, Tim Burg, Heather Laskin. Trending Today USA 08-17-16 Part 2

Image credit: Syafiq Adnan / Shutterstock.com

Nice Just Filed photos

Check out these just filed images:

Starry Night Rose – Hybrid Oil & HDR
just filed
Image by freestock.ca ♡ dare to share beauty
Mixed media photomanipulation combining an HDR rose macro and a public domain painting called The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh (circa 1889). The latter being one of my all-time favorite traditional artists, I just wish he lived longer to share more of his vision.

In any case, here’s hoping to breathe fresh new life into van Gogh’s painting by blending it with a modern HDR photo of mine. Some people may wonder why I would share this as stock, but my belief has always been that stock does not have to be any different than art except for the purposes it serves and how it can be used. So I’m happy to share this as long as it can be appreciated and put to good use 🙂

This photo is released under a standard Creative Commons License – Attribution 3.0 Unported. It gives you a lot of freedom to use my work commercially as long as you credit and link back to the same free image from my website, www.freestock.ca

Dormition Cathedral. January 2007
just filed
Image by Matt. Create.
Sometimes files sit on your hard drive forever because you just can’t convey the mood and feeling you want. Obviously I took a few liberties with the processing here, but I like what it conveys to me. I hope you like it too.