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Rescue on Rolling Acres

A few nice just filed lawsuits images I found:

Rescue on Rolling Acres
just filed lawsuits
Image by hodge
Boy will this one be a mess of lawsuits, charges and counter-charges.

Came home from work today to be greeting be a huge array of flashing lights and vehicles. It turns out that a worker who had been working on a water main ~12 feet underground got flooded with water and mud up over his waist and was unable to get free, even with the help of his co-workers. 3 1/2 hours later he was finally freed after a big effort by rescue workers, construction crews, emts and police officers.

Ministry of Labour laws require that holes deeper than 4′-0" be shored and reinforced. None of those were in evidence on this site. This poor guy was working within several tons of wet, unreinforced mud and he was very lucky not to have been buried alive. No doubt the Ministry will crack down hard on the contractor. It remains to be seen just how severe the charges will be.

All of this is on top of the lawsuit the current homeowners are filing against the people who sold them the house for failing to disclose the severe problems which necessitated this work in the first place.

Talk about an exciting homecoming after 3 weeks in the UK!! (those photos are in the works).

Nice Filed Lawsuits photos

Some cool filed lawsuits images:

Pedestrian plaza outside Los Angeles World Trade Center, Bunker Hill Towers, and Disney Hall
filed lawsuits
Image by jann_on
Pedestrian plaza is part of the Calvin S. Hamilton Pedway:

"The Calvin S. Hamilton Pedway, as the system is formally known, is a network of elevated walkways that was first presented in the 1970 Concept Los Angeles: The Concept for the Los Angeles General Plan. Hamilton was the city planning director at the time, having taken the position in 1964. The plan, adopted by the city in 1974, promoted dense commercial developments connected to one another by a rapid transit system. The plan was abandoned in 1981 when federal funding for the project was eliminated. Hamilton stepped down from his position in 1985 after a criminal investigation."
www.kcet.org/socal/departures/landofsunshine/block-by-blo…

"The pedways fall within the Downtown Center Business Improvement District, but the organization’s CEO says its strained resources can only cover maintenance crews on the pedways about once a week."
articles.latimes.com/2013/may/23/opinion/la-ed-pedways-20…

—-

Bunker Hill Towers (aka Bunker Hill Apartments aka Bunker Hill Residential Towers):
Built ca. 1966–68.
Architect: Robert Evans Alexander.

www.you-are-here.com/los_angeles/bunker_hill.html
www.essexapartmenthomes.com/apartment/bunker-hill-towers-…
www.yelp.com/biz/bunker-hill-towers-apartments-los-angeles
www.apartmentratings.com/rate/CA-Los-Angeles-Bunker-Hill-…
laforum.org/content/articles/downtown-again-by-peter-zellner

ZIMAS data:
Central City Community Plan Area, Freeway Adjacent Advisory Notice for Sensitive Uses, Greater Downtown Housing Incentive Area, Los Angeles State Enterprise Zone, General Plan Land Use= "Regional Center Commercial", Downtown Adaptive Reuse Incentive Area, Bunker Hill Redevelopment Project, w/in 500 feet of USC Hybrid High, Downtown Center Business Improvement District, Central City Revitalization Zone.

Assessment:
Assessed Land Val.: ,262,053
Assessed Improvement Val.: ,664,155
Last Owner Change: 04/01/98
Last Sale Amount: ,080,180

Year Built: 1968

"The 19-story, Robert Evans Alexander-designed Bunker Hill Towers opened in 1968. After the demolition of 7,310 pre-existing homes and forced relocation of their residents, Bunker Hill Towers became the residence for nearly all of Bunker Hill’s remaining residents. More than a decade would pass before the nearby residential Angelus Plaza and Promenade Towers opened. Long before the redeveloped loft crowd discovered downtown thousands lived in such residences, including Cathay Manor, Little Tokyo Towers, and hardest to ignore, on the streets."
www.kcet.org/socal/departures/landofsunshine/block-by-blo…

Robert Evans Alexander:
rmc.library.cornell.edu/EAD/htmldocs/RMM03087.html
digital.lib.washington.edu/architect/architects/180/
www.modernsandiego.com/RobertAlexander.html
archive.org/details/architectureplan01alex
archive.org/details/architectureplan02alex
articles.latimes.com/1992-12-02/news/mn-1120_1_r-e-alexander
joshtonies.com/?p=79
babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015027871386;seq=3;v…

—-

Walt Disney Concert Hall:
111 South Grand Avenue

Project search announced: 1987.
Initial design approved: 1988.
"Final" design approved: 1991.
Ground broken for the garage: 1992.
Hall actually built: 1999–2003.

Architect: Frank Gehry / Gehry Partners, LLP / Frank O. Gehry & Associates (“FOG/A”)
Executive Architect: Dan Dworsky / Dworsky Architects (at least initially, off the project by ’94)
Project Designers: Michael Maltzan (at least initially, left to start his own firm in ’95), Craig Webb (I believe).
Acoustic Design: Yasuhisa Toyota for Nagata Acoustics, with preliminary work by Minoru Nagata
Overall Project Management: Fred Stegeman for Stegeman/Kastner Inc. (initially until ca. ’95, I think)
Project Management w/in Gehry’s Firm: James Glymph (at least initially)
Structural Engineering: CBM Engineering (at least initially)
Garden Design: Melinda Taylor
Woodwork: Columbia Showcase (headed by Joe Patterson)

Software: Catia (by Dassault). (Primary responsibility for pushing for use of this software in Gehry’s office goes to partner James Glymph. During the later construction phase [2001–3], a 4D scheduling modeling system was also used that was developed by CIFE at Stanford and Walt Disney Imagineers, using Catia as its base, I think.)
Software consultants: C-Cubed (ca. 1991–94)

Client: A seven-member architectural search committee was set up by the Music Center in 1987 and chaired by Richard Koshalek, with Daniel Commins as acoustic advisor. In 1989, the twelve-member Walt Disney Concert Hall Committee was formally established and thereupon headed by Frederick M. Nicholas on a volunteer basis until about 1995. The land ("Parcel K") was owned by Los Angeles County and the County was represented in negotiations by attorney Richard S. Volpert, at least from 1989 to 1995. Sally Reed was CAO of the county for much of this period until 1995, but I’m not sure how directly involved she was with this project. The Philharmonic was initially represented by Ernest Fleischmann, managing director, with input from Esa-Pekka Salonen, the music director. (In 2001, Debra Borda became the new head at the Philharmonic, Esa-Pekka Salonen remained music director.) Lillian Disney represented herself and her family as the single largest private donor until her death in 1998, with Diane Disney Miller also on the committee and serving as its vice-chair at one point. Sharon Disney Lund was also involved in the negotiations until her death in 1993. They also acted through the family attorney, Ron Gother. From 1995 to 1997, Harry Hufford served as volunteer full-time CEO of the committee, with Suzanne Marx his vice-president for development, and a mandate to save the project and recapitalize it. At various points, other committee members included Stuart Ketchum, James A. Thomas, and Ronald J. Arnault. Mayor Riordan was also heavily involved. Riordan brought in Eli Broad to help finance the completion. In 1996, Andrea Van De Kamp became the new chair of the Music Center. (Sheldon G. Stanfill was president of the Music Center in the early 1990s.) In 1997, a new oversight committee was formed, with Eli Broad and Diane Disney Miller as chief guiding members. In 1998, William Siart, a member of the oversight committee, became chair of the main committee (the legal entity at the center of this confusion).

Financial auditing/oversight: Hines Interests (beginning in ’94, with Bruce Frey heading this work).

Owner: The County of Los Angeles, with the facility operated by a nonprofit under a Master Lease Agreement. (I believe this is an accurate summary of the situation, but I am not fully certain. The agreement is complicated and I believe it involves a sublease back to the County that obliges it to provide building and grounds maintenance, and then another subsublease to the organization that runs programming, which has subleases to the Philharmonic and the Music Center. So if I’ve made a muddle of that, I apologize.)

Major Donors: Lilian Disney, Eli Broad, The Disney Corporation, Ron Burkle, The Ralphs/Food4Less Foundation, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, The Times Mirror Foundation, Richard Riordan, Roy E. Disney (specifically for REDCAT), Pacific Bell Foundation, and Deloitte & Touche. (The County also provided significant funds to the parking garage.)

Seats 2,265.

Current home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Features an organ with 72 stops, 109 ranks, and 6,125 pipes, co-designed by Frank Gehry and Manuel Rosales, with assistance from Kevin Gilchrist, and built by Caspar Glatter-Götz, with engineering assistance from Heinz Kremnitzer. Early in the process, a special committee was formed (with Cherry Rhodes, Robert Anderson, and Michael Barone serving)—just for finding the right organ designer, settling on Manuel Rosales in 1990. Michael Barone also served as a consultant during the final design process.
www.gg-organs.com/eng/projects/images/Aprcovfeat.pdf

"In 1982, the family company, Retlaw Enterprises, sold the rights to Walt Disney’s name and likeness to the Walt Disney Co. for million. That money was put aside for an unspecified charitable gift. . . . In 1987, Music Center then-Chairman F. Daniel Frost, who had been Walt Disney’s tax attorney, presented Lillian Disney with Los Angeles Times articles detailing the Music Center’s desire for a new concert hall. Disney readily agreed to donate her funds. At the time, Frost was the son-in-law of Music Center founder Dorothy Chandler and was a board member of Times Mirror, parent company of The Times. He has since divorced and has left the Times Mirror board."
articles.latimes.com/1995-02-27/news/mn-36686_1_disney-hall (’95)

The 1987/88 idea to use Parcel K for a new Philharmonic was not without significant opposition, including that out the outgoing CAO of the county, Jim Hankla, and architect Barton Myers, who both proposed that the new concert hall be built on the L.A. mall:
articles.latimes.com/1987-02-22/local/me-5387_1_music-cen…

"Lillian Disney made an initial gift of million in 1987 to build a performance venue as a gift to the people of Los Angeles and a tribute to Walt Disney’s devotion to the arts and to the city. . . . Upon completion in 2003, the project cost an estimated 4 million; the parking garage alone cost 0 million. The remainder of the total cost was paid by private donations, of which the Disney family’s contribution was estimated to .5 million with another million from The Walt Disney Company. By comparison, the three existing halls of the Music Center cost million in the 1960s (about 0 million in today’s dollars). . . . The walls and ceiling of the hall are finished with Douglas-fir while the floor is finished with oak. The Hall’s reverberation time is approximately 2.2 seconds unoccupied and 2.0 seconds occupied."
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Disney_Concert_Hall

It is worth pointing out that the final building hardly resembles the competition designs and models from the invited design competition in 1988 and substantially deviated from the 1991 designs and models in several key areas such as cladding and landscaping.

By the end, the design process apparently included over 30,000 drawings and models.
www.mediabistro.com/unbeige/disney-hall-turns-a-corner_b1653

From an initial field of ca. 80 entrants, then winnowed to a list of 25, the other three finalists in 1988 were Gottfried Böhm, Hans Hollein, and James Stirling.

From 1990 to 1991, the project faced a lawsuit brought by a group called A Local and Regional Monitor, represented by Sabrina Schiller, which alleged that there had not been a sufficient review of environmental and traffic impacts. Gary Justice, Pamela Schmidt, and Helen Parker represented the project and defeated the lawsuit and appeal.
www.gibsondunn.com/fstore/documents/pubs/AForbes_Eye_For_…

Another set of delays in 1990 came from a newer demand from the county that the site incorporate a hotel, in order to raise further revenue in the form of hotel taxes. Gemtel was to be the hotel developer and they were to bring in Ritz Carlton as operator. This was scrapped in 1991 when Ritz Carlton refused to agree to hire unionized labor and/or take on a living wage rule (the exact disagreement is somewhat unclear to me).

The 1991 models and other mock-ups premiered at the Fifth International Exhibition of Architecture at the Venice Biennale in 1991 to great acclaim, before being submitted for approval.

These mock-ups for the models were designed using Catia, "a 3D modeler made for the aerospace industry by Dassault, a French software company associated with IBM."
larrybarrow.com/assets/dissertation/Vol-2-back/A4-FOGA.pdf

"At one point, someone estimated that the project had over 90 consultants."
www.economist.com/node/86629 (’97)

During the first phase of the project, "a consortium of General Contracting firms, (Peck Jones, Turner Construction, and Obayashi) were selected to form the building entity, Concert Hall Builders." Yet I am not sure who the final constructing firms were.
larrybarrow.com/assets/dissertation/Vol-2-back/A4-FOGA.pdf

In 1994, the cost estimate skyrocketed by million and the project was put on hold pending auditing and financial review by Hines.
"According to committee budgets, some of the biggest increases in construction and material costs were in the steel framing, .6 million more than originally thought; in wood purchases and millwork, up million, partly because of a decision to add interior wood; and in drywalling and plaster, up .9 million. ‘The drywall designed for this hall has curves and movement that don’t have any comparison to anything else that’s been built in this city,’ Nicholas said. ‘The people who were bidding the drywall had never seen anything like it, hadn’t had any experience with it. So they put a lot of contingencies in it and they bid it very, very high. A bright spot is the purchasing, cutting and installation of the exterior Italian limestone–a process Gehry has closely supervised. Bids on that stonework are reported to be 5,000 below its original .6-million estimate.’"
articles.latimes.com/1994-08-27/news/mn-31646_1_disney-ha…

As described above, a major shake-up of operations occurred ca. 1995.
"Dworsky indicated, as a matter of tracking what happened to whom, it is quite simple, of all the major original participants (i.e. architects, engineers, builders, and project managers), no one survived except FOGA."
larrybarrow.com/assets/dissertation/Vol-2-back/A4-FOGA.pdf

The garden, initially a major feature of the design brief, has all but disappeared. It is supposedly partially on the roof? I have no idea. I never much noticed a garden during any of my visits to Disney Hall, although I didn’t mind the landscaping I did notice. In any case, Melinda Taylor was a fairly late addition to the project.

"She came in after a number of other designers, including Philadelphia landscape architect Laurie Olin and Nancy Goslee Powers, who did the Norton Simon Museum’s garden, had come and gone on the job."
articles.latimes.com/2002/mar/21/news/lv-disney21

“‘Wow! Did I do that? Holy shit! Did I do that?’ Sometimes you look at it that way,” Gehry says, taking in the flowing ribbons of steel at street level and then gazing up at the luffing “mainsails” at the center of the building—forms which seem to defy engineering, and which were conceived by Gehry as squiggly lines on a piece of paper more than 16 years ago. . . . Gehry, probably the most famous architect in the world right now, and arguably the most important and influential, is a modest figure in a profession known for its massive egos."
www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2003/09/disney-concer… (2003)

"If Gehry lived in Idaho, we would see snowmobiles in his designs; he is an architect stuck in a feedback loop with his surroundings. As it is, he lives by the Pacific and owns a sailboat, and so it is seagoing vessels we see in his buildings: the boat-shaped main gallery of the Guggenheim Bilbao, the concert hall in Disney. ‘When I started Disney Hall,’ says Gehry, ‘I saw a show at the Toledo Museum in Ohio called In Praise of Ships in the Sea, and I got really excited about these shapes. I saw them in the wood ceiling I was already doing, and I brought them in.’ A metaphor took hold of Gehry: A concert was a journey, the hall would be a boat, the steel forms that shot into the air over L.A. its sails."
www.lamag.com/features/2003/10/12/how-disney-hall-redeeme… (quote on page 5)

For a student’s perspective on the use of nautical forms, see: couplarchideas.wordpress.com/2012/11/28/similarity-betwee…

books.google.com/books?id=WWl29hn0C9gC&lpg=PA72&v…
www.latimes.com/news/local/cl-ca-uroussoff19oct19,0,64916… (Ouroussoff, 2003)
www.nytimes.com/2003/10/23/arts/architecture-review-a-moo… (Muschamp, 2003)
www.slate.com/articles/arts/architecture/2003/10/epic_arc… (Hawthorne, 2003)
www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1264860 (Stamberg, 2003)
www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2003/08/17/a-mighty-monume… (McGuigan, 2003)
www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/arts/cl-et-swed1jul01,… (Swed, 2003)
www.businessweek.com/stories/2003-10-05/frank-gehrys-high… (Palmieri, 2003)
www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2003/oct/23/victory-at-… (Filler, 2003, paywall)
www.riprense.com/Silverstunt.htm (contrarian view, ca. 2003)
articles.latimes.com/2003/oct/25/entertainment/et-fisher25 (blurb round-up, 2003)
books.google.com/books?id=c2Kwa-EZR2IC&lpg=PA106&… (photo of opening night, 2003)
articles.latimes.com/1988-04-29/news/vw-2468_1_concert-hall (1988)
articles.latimes.com/1991-09-05/local/me-2333_1_walt-disn… (Isenberg, ’91)
articles.latimes.com/1991-09-15/realestate/re-3191_1_disn… (’91)
www.nytimes.com/1992/12/13/arts/architecture-view-gehry-s… (Muschamp, ’92)
articles.latimes.com/1992-11-22/magazine/tm-2024_1_disney… (’92)
articles.latimes.com/1994-11-03/news/mn-58297_1_concert-hall (1994)
books.google.com/books?id=rF0EAAAAMBAJ&pg=PT72&lp… (’96, scroll back a page or two for the start of the article titled "Why L.A. Hates Frank Gehry")
www.newyorker.com/archive/1997/07/07/1997_07_07_038_TNY_C… (’97)
www.laphil.com/philpedia/about-walt-disney-concert-hall
www.laphil.com
www.aia.org/cities/los-angeles/all-stories/disneyconcerth…
www.arcspace.com/features/gehry-partners-llp/walt-disney-…
www.laweekly.com/2003-10-30/music/organomics/ (on the organ, 2003)
www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/arts/la-et-disneyhall6… (Swed, 2008)
illumin.usc.edu/177/
interactive.wttw.com/tenbuildings/walt-disney-concert-hall
en.wikiarquitectura.com/index.php/Walt_Disney_Concert_Hall
www.nbm.org/exhibitions-collections/exhibitions/symphony-…
www.johnmartin.com/publications/Disney%20Concert%20Hall/D…
books.google.com/books?id=CooTi-asobIC&lpg=PA48&o…

Frank Gehry:
www.foga.com
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Gehry
www.gehrytechnologies.com
www.getty.edu/pacificstandardtime/explore-the-era/people/…
www.getty.edu/pacificstandardtime/explore-the-era/archive…
www.latimesmagazine.com/2008/10/frank-gehry-annie-gilbar….
www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/los-angeles/frank-geh… (Frances Anderton)
larrybarrow.com/assets/dissertation/Vol-2-back/A4-FOGA.pdf
www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQ-Kf3sJfok (ca. 5 minutes)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRjnoNkaJUs (+1 hour long talk with Frank Gehry and others about him and the Los Angeles arts community)

Catia:
www.3ds.com/products/catia/
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CATIA
worldcadaccess.typepad.com/blog/2012/05/whats-the-price-o…
www.mcadcentral.com/catia-software-development/
www.caddigest.com/subjects/aec/select/022304_day_gehry.htm

4D modeling:
cife.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/WP064.pdf

James Glymph:
Was a partner at Gehry’s firm for 19 years (ca. 1989–2008) and was founding CEO of Gehry Technologies.

"In the 1980s, he worked with LMN Architects in downtown Seattle, heading the team that designed the San Diego Convention Center."
www.aiaseattle.org/KBD/about_glymph.htm

www.laiserin.com/laiserinlive/speakers/glymph.php
www.miamialum.org/s/916/interior-3-col.aspx?sid=916&g… (scroll down to "Edges Torn Open")
archrecord.construction.com/innovation/1_TechBriefs/0310G…
businessmodelalchemist.com/blog/2010/09/on-business-model… (scroll down for video)

Dan Dworksy:
I feel the need to point out that though Dan Dworsky is currently rather maligned within the Los Angeles architectural community, especially for his involvement in this project, he’s directly responsible for my favorite Bunker Hill buildings, the Angelus Plaza senior housing complex, as well as the very decent Figueroa Courtyard. The vision of a revived Bunker Hill with more than just tall glass boxes of office space owes a great deal to his efforts over the years.
digital.lib.washington.edu/architect/architects/273/
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Dworsky
sma.sciarc.edu/subclip/takeyama-minourou-and-daniel-dwors…

Michael Maltzan:
A rising star in the California architectural scene, recently garnering praise and awards for his New Carver Apartments for the Skid Row Housing Trust. A building that provides transitional housing for the recently formerly homeless, it’s one I don’t like for a number of nit-picky reasons, but whose social conscience I credit. One of his most prominent commissions was for another performance hall—Mashouf Performing Arts Center for SF State. My favorite of his works is the Billy Wilder Theatre at the Hammer, which is a great size for films they screen and makes me think every time that I’ve snuck inside a fancy, sexy lipstick holder from the late 1980s: hot pink, sleek black, kiss kiss. I also think he did a wonderful job with MoMA QNS, the temporary (and more fun) home of MoMA while the main building was being revamped during the early 2000s.

"Michael Maltzan established his independent practice in Los Angeles in 1995. After graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design (1985) and Harvard’s Graduate School of Design (1988), he worked briefly in Boston for Schwartz/Silver Architects and then for Machado and Silvetti Associates. . . Then in 1988, Maltzan moved to California, where he joined the office of Frank Gehry. . . In Gehry’s office, Maltzan worked on the initial design stages of the acclaimed Walt Disney Concert Hall (1988–2004) for Los Angeles and was project designer for the tautly elegant Vontz Center for Molecular Studies (1993–1999) at the University of Cincinnati."
www.mmaltzan.com/essays/essay-alternate-ground/
www.mmaltzan.com
www.mmaltzan.com/profile/michael-maltzan/
www.arcspace.com/features/michael-maltzan-architecture/
www.arcspace.com/the-architects-studio/michael-maltzan-sk…
places.designobserver.com/feature/no-more-play/26888/

Yasuhisa Toyota:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yasuhisa_Toyota
live.stanford.edu/bingconcerthall/files/ch-na.pdf
www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,543822,00.html
www.nagata.co.jp/e_index.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nagata_Acoustics

Craig Webb:
Senior partner (currently?) at Gehry Partners and the main designer assigned to Disney Hall after Michael Maltzan left the firm.

Before joining Gehry, Webb worked at Albert C. Martin & Associates and Barton Myers Associates.

"The 125-employee office is structured like a pyramid, with Gehry delegating creative work to two principal architects: Webb and Edwin Chan, who oversee design and direct project teams. . . . And while Bilbao was the defining project for Chan, Disney Hall belongs to Webb. ‘There’s a lot of him in there,’ says Gehry. . . . ‘They’re different personalities,’ says Gehry. ‘When Craig makes stuff, it’s more real. Edwin is more outgoing with people,’ he continues. ‘He seems to enjoy dealing with clients, the personal stuff. It’s different than how Craig does it. He is a little shy or reticent, not as gregarious. He gets a little fussy sometimes. Like everybody else, he gets insecure.’ . . . Gehry describes the younger architect as intuitive, with good communication and analytical skills and what he calls excellent ‘hand-eye coordination’ — the ability to see, explore and realize Gehry’s ideas. ‘He can play with me on that level.’"
articles.latimes.com/2003/sep/17/entertainment/et-roug17

Manuel Rosales:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Rosales_(organ_builder)

Caspar Glatter-Götz:
www.gg-organs.com
www.gg-organs.com/eng/projects/disney.htm
www.gg-organs.com/eng/projects/images/Aprcovfeat.pdf
books.google.com/books?id=cgDJaeFFUPoC&lpg=PA225&…

Melinda Taylor:
Landscape designer, married to Craig Webb. This seems to have been her single largest project, although she has also worked on smaller projects and private gardens in Los Angeles.
www.melindataylor.com
articles.latimes.com/2002/mar/21/news/lv-disney21

Frederick M. Nicholas:
"Frederick M. Nicholas, an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of California since 1952, is a specialist in Real Estate Development and Leases. He is President of The Hapsmith Company, a Real Estate Development Firm with major interests in Northern and Southern California."
www.frederickmnicholas.com
www.frederickmnicholas.com/400_images/wdchpdfs/1993%20fal…
www.gibsondunn.com/fstore/documents/pubs/AForbes_Eye_For_…

Frederick Stegeman (d. 2009):
www.s-and-k.com/about/index.html

Harry Hufford:
"Hufford served as the chief administrator for Los Angeles County from 1974 to 1985 and worked as interim chief administrative officer in Ventura County from December 1999 to [2001]."
articles.latimes.com/2001/may/13/local/me-62999

"As CAO, Hufford was responsible for preparation and presentation of the County budget to the Board of Supervisors; administrative supervision of County departments; and management studies."
ceo.lacounty.gov/pdf/bio/hlh.pdf

Prior to being named acting CAO in 1974, Hufford had spent almost his entire career, with some interruptions, working in the staff of the CAO office, beginning initially in 1953.

He also served as an administrative officer at Gibson Dunn, and as a past president of the Music Center.

In 2001, he won the Earl Warren Public Service Award.
In 2003, there was a settlement in a sexual harassment suit against him.

articles.latimes.com/2003/apr/23/local/me-hufford23
articles.latimes.com/keyword/harry-hufford

—-

A discussion on the 1979 Bunker Hill CRA competition and Gehry’s participation in that. Most of the proposed projects mentioned did not get built:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rUrkUi2GKM

Forest Haven
filed lawsuits
Image by Jack Parrott
FH was a children’s developmental center and mental institution in Laurel, Maryland.

It was notorious for its poor conditions and abuse of patients. It opened its doors in 1925, and was shut down in 1991 by a federal court. There have since been numerous civil and class-action lawsuits involving patients and employees

During the early years, it was considered a state of the art facility. With a good reputation, this hospital set the standard for other states to follow. With declining conditions decades later, many patients filed lawsuits against the hospital for reasons of abuse, neglect, poor living conditions — even medical testing. A small morgue was all that stood between the patients and a cemetery on site where graves had been repeatedly uncovered by erosion.

Erin Brockovich

Check out these filed lawsuit images:

Erin Brockovich
filed lawsuit
Image by Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer
Erin Brockovich Legal Eagle And Environmentalist Speaks At University of Sydney

Erin Brockovich, legal eagle and environmentalist spoke at the the University of Sydney earlier this evening.

I was delighted to attend, meet and photograph this extraordinary woman.

The Lecture…

Distinguished Speakers Program: Erin Brockovich

Paying it forward – Erin Brockovich 12 years on…

The Erin Brockovich phenomenon as born from its movie beginnings and consolidated by years of environmental advocacy is as strongly identified in Australia today as when the iconic movie was released in 2000. In a case that went on to become a Hollywood movie Erin spearheaded a legal battle that led to the largest legal settlement in US history for a toxic tort involving 600 residents.

In the lecture, Erin shared her unique experiences over the past twelve years and looks forward to the next twelve.

Now a successful author, international speaker and award winner Erin dedicates her time to advising several law firms in the US and exclusively to Shine Lawyers in Australia. For over 18 years she has continued to crusade for the rights of people and protection of the environment.

The lecture was presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012.

Erin Brockovich Biography…

Say the name Erin Brockovich and you think, strong, tough, stubborn and sexy. Erin is all that and definitely more.

She is a modern-day “David” who loves a good brawl with today’s “Goliaths”.

She thrives on being the voice for those who don’t know how to yell.

She is a rebel. She is a fighter. She is a mother. She is a woman. She is you and me.

It’s been 10 years since Julia Roberts starred in the Oscar-winning tour de force “Erin Brockovich”. The film turned an unknown legal researcher into a 20th century icon by showcasing how her dogged persistence was the impelling force behind the largest medical settlement lawsuit in history. Since then, Erin hasn’t been resting on her laurels… she continues to fight hard and win big!

This gutsy broad doesn’t apologize for who she is. She has always loved going head to head with the big boys and was never intimated by their bravado. She learned how to come out on top from her tight-knit mid-western family in Lawrence, Kansas. Erin was the youngest child of an industrial engineer father and journalist mother. Her parents always believed that she could do anything she set her mind to if she learned to focus her amazing energy.

After a few years roaming around at various colleges, Erin decided that she wanted to be a California girl. She first landed a job as a management trainee for K-Mart but when that didn’t make her swagger, she decided to study electrical engineering. But that wasn’t enough for the Kansas beauty… on a fluke, she entered the Miss Pacific Coast beauty pageant… and, not surprising, won the title.

When she realized that beauty pageants weren’t her thing, Erin, her husband and two children settled in Reno, Nevada. After divorcing, the single mother became a secretary at a brokerage firm where she met and married her second husband. But that marriage was short lived and the now mother of three was solo again.

Up until this point, Erin was the average divorced single mother trying to make a living… until she crossed paths with lawyer, Ed Masry, and changed the course of both their lives.

After being seriously injured in a traffic accident in Reno, Erin moved back to California’s San Fernando Valley, and hired Masry & Vititoe to represent her. They won a small settlement but she still needed work so she got a job at their law firm as a file clerk, it was while organizing papers on a pro bono real estate case that Erin first found medical records that would explode into the largest direct action lawsuit in US history.

Erin’s exhaustive investigation uncovered that Pacific Gas & Electric had been poisoning the small town of Hinkley’s Water for over 30 years. It was because of Erin’s unwavering tenacity that PG & E had been exposed for leaking toxic Chromium 6 into the ground water. This poison affected the health of the population of Hinkley. In 1996, as a result of the largest direct action lawsuit of its kind, spear-headed by Erin and Ed Masry, the utility giant was forced to pay out the largest toxic tort injury settlement in US history: 3 million in damages to more than 600 Hinkley residents.

The story and eventual film helped make the “Erin Brockovich” a household name. Over time, Erin realized that she could use her notoriety to spread positive messages of personal empowerment and to encourage others to stand up and make a difference.

Erin Brockovich has conquered all forms of media… Her first TV project was ABC’s 2001 special “Challenge America With Erin Brockovich” where she helped motivate and organize the rebuilding of a dilapidated park in downtown Manhattan. This show is best described as “Extreme Make-Over Home Edition” on steroids.

Then, for three seasons, Erin hosted the Lifetime series, “Final Justice With Erin Brockovich”. The show celebrated everyday women who triumphed when faced with overwhelming adversity.

Erin then dominated the world of publishing with her New York Times Business best-seller, “Take It From Me. Life’s A Struggle, But You Can Win”.

Because of her fighting spirit, Erin has become the champion of countless women and men. She is this generations, “Dear Abby” and in fact receives thousands of “Dear Erin” letters and emails each year from people who are begging for help and support in their own personal struggles. Erin proudly answers every one of them.

As President of Brockovich Research & Consulting, she is currently involved in numerous environmental projects worldwide.

Erin is one of the most requested speakers on the international lecture circuit and travels the world for personal appearances.

Erin Brockovich is a true American hero who’s icon status and “stick-to-it-iveness” only fuels her determination to expose injustice and lend her voice to those who do not have one.

She has requests for her help in ground water contamination complaints in every state of the US, Australia and other international hot spots. She is currently working on cases in California, Texas, Florida, Michigan, Illinois and Missouri.

Erin lives in Southern California with her husband, three children and 5 Pomeranians and admits to one guilty pleasure… shopping (Credit: Erin Brockovich)

Websites

Erin Brockovich official website
www.brockovich.com

The University of Sydney
www.sydney.edu.au

Shine Lawyers
www.shine.com.au

Eva Rinaldi Photography Flickr
www.flickr.com/evarinaldiphotography

Eva Rinaldi Photography
www.evarinaldi.com

Scientology operative Warren McShane attends anti-SLAPP hearing 3 Feb 2014 036
filed lawsuit
Image by Truth Revealed2012
Pictured: Scientology operative Warren McShane. McShane is the President and CEO of Scientology’s Religious Technology Center (RTC). Captain David Miscavige is the Chairman (COB) of RTC.

Who is Warren McShane?

startpage.com/do/search?q=warren+mcshane+scientology

*****

Today was another eventful day in New Braunfels, Texas, where Monique Rathbun’s lawsuit against the Church of Scientology and its leader David Miscavige is back in the Comal County courthouse for another hearing.

On January 8, Scientology’s attorneys presented their arguments supporting an ‘anti-SLAPP’ motion against Monique’s lawsuit, accusing her of filing a harassing suit that infringes on the church’s free speech rights. After the church turned over new evidence last week, Monique presented her argument against the motion.

For complete coverage follow Tony Ortega’s Underground Bunker

tonyortega.org/2014/02/03/monique-rathbun-tries-to-slap-d…

Lawsuit Allegedly Filed By Man Who Shot Gabby Giffords Could Be A Hoax – Newsy

A federal court official told KPNX late Wednesday the lawsuit thought to be filed by Jared Lee Loughner was actually written by another inmate.

Transcript:
A lawsuit that was originally believed to have been filed by the gunman who shot former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords in a mass shooting in Arizona in 2011 could be a hoax.
A federal court official told KPNX late Wednesday the million suit reportedly filed by Jared Lee Loughner was actually written by “another mentally disturbed prisoner in Philadelphia who is impersonating Loughner.”
The federal court filing blames Giffords for emotional and psychological distress, claiming he is innocent and was “hand-picked” to be an assassin.
The two-page suit reads, in part, “My incarceration is illegal. I am actually innocent. I was framed.” It also claims the government put a chip in his head and that Giffords only pretended to be shot and is part of a “global plot to take away our civil liberties.”
Loughner is currently serving time in Rochester, Minnesota. But this suit was apparently postmarked in Philadelphia, which is where a hoax lawsuit was sent from earlier this month in the name of the Uber driver accused of shooting eight people in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in February.
Loughner reportedly has a history of mental illness, something the judge knew before his sentencing. According to CNN, the judge said, “The evidence clearly shows that he knew what he was doing, despite his mental illness.” He sentenced Loughner to seven consecutive life terms plus 140 years.
The 2011 shooting left Giffords permanently injured, but she has made a pretty impressive recovery and has even hit the campaign trail recently to stump for Hillary Clinton.
“Speaking is hard for me, but come January, I want to say these two words: Madam President,” Giffords said in a recent speech.
This video includes clips from WXYZ and Hillary for America and images from Getty Images.

Sources:
A lawsuit that was originally believed to have been filed by the gunman who shot former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords in a mass shooting in Arizona in 2011 could be a hoax.
A federal court official told KPNX late Wednesday the million suit reportedly filed by Jared Lee Loughner was actually written by “another mentally disturbed prisoner in Philadelphia who is impersonating Loughner.”
The federal court filing blames Giffords for emotional and psychological distress, claiming he is innocent and was “hand-picked” to be an assassin.
The two-page suit reads, in part, “My incarceration is illegal. I am actually innocent. I was framed.” It also claims the government put a chip in his head and that Giffords only pretended to be shot and is part of a “global plot to take away our civil liberties.”
Loughner is currently serving time in Rochester, Minnesota. But this suit was apparently postmarked in Philadelphia, which is where a hoax lawsuit was sent from earlier this month in the name of the Uber driver accused of shooting eight people in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in February.
Loughner reportedly has a history of mental illness, something the judge knew before his sentencing. According to CNN, the judge said, “The evidence clearly shows that he knew what he was doing, despite his mental illness.” He sentenced Loughner to seven consecutive life terms plus 140 years.
The 2011 shooting left Giffords permanently injured, but she has made a pretty impressive recovery and has even hit the campaign trail recently to stump for Hillary Clinton.
“Speaking is hard for me, but come January, I want to say these two words: Madam President,” Giffords said in a recent speech.
This video includes clips from WXYZ and Hillary for America and images from Getty Images.

————————————-

Newsy is your source for concise, unbiased video news and analysis covering the top stories from around the world. With persistent curiosity and no agenda, we strive to fuel meaningful conversations by highlighting multiple sides of every story. Newsy delivers the news and perspective you need without the hype and bias common to many news sources.

See more at http://www.newsy.com/
Like Newsy on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/newsyvideos/

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The Ease Of Filing Lawsuits Contributes To Rising Insurance Costs

Advertisements will leap out at you whether you are driving past a billboard, looking in the phone book or newspaper, or even when you are watching your television. We can assist you whether you have been in a car crash, experienced whiplash, or injured in an accident. Over and over you will see advertisements that show people who are injured and their lawyers offering to give you the best service for absolutely free until a claim is made. Certain promotions actually boast the ability to provide financial advances against potential damage awards or settlements.

The insurance industry is claiming that the lawyers’ aggressive advertisements are bringing in more and more personal injury lawsuits. Because so many of these suits are taking place, some companies have decided to nix their auto insurance coverage. The bureau’s regional services manager claims that he is noticing only small amounts of damage in accidents and people trying to get large awards, and at times actually getting the large awards. The insurance group representative stated that the industry has no problem paying awards when true injuries occur, though it does become problematic when plaintiffs make exorbitant monetary demands.

The actual amount that claims are increasing auto insurance premiums is different for each company. Good driving risks will only see an increase of fifteen to thirty-five percent. But, if you’ve had an accident or gotten a ticket, you’ll see much higher increases.

Lawyers dispute the fact that their ads and claim cost increases are related. There is one lawyer who states he can’t even make sense out of the supposed connection between the ads and claims. When someone has a good claim to make against another driver, they should be allowed to do so. The offer of short-term loans on the promise of future claims may be a violation of the lawyers? code of ethics. Law associations are researching this.

One lawyer agrees that there is a proliferation of advertising by personal injury lawyers and that this may actually increase the number of claims filed. He doesn’t see a problem with this increase. It’s unfortunate that the insurance bureau finds the fact that lawyers are telling people about their rights and how to go about asserting those rights. He does see the increase in insurance company costs and admits the system could be improved, but he notes the fact that insurance companies are not willing to work with association to make those changes.

Of course, the president of the bar association states that the insurance companies are trying to place the blame on someone for raising their premiums, and are looking for a way to bring their compensation costs down, as opposed to figuring out a way to prevent the accidents. There isn’t any lobbying by insurance for increased fines for photo radar or bans on cell phone use by drivers, he said. He goes on to say that there is a question of why insurance companies aren’t trying to increase roadway safety and aren’t trying to come up with ways to decrease accidents. He says that the investments the insurance industry has made have taken the brunt of the force, as well as the profits they have made.

Legislation has been introduced to stop injured motorists from “double dipping.” Cases have been seen when claimants want to be compensated for lost work time, but their own companies have already compensated for this. The worst part is that the claimants would receive their gross wages. Absolutely no deductions have been taken. This doesn?t create a situation where the employee would want to get back to work. Higher compensation is paid the longer you are off work.

The lawyers don’t have current numbers on how many injury accident lawyers are currently practicing, but they agree there are few places that let so many lawsuits be filed. Motorists can usually sue for pain and suffering, but in some locales, the injuries have to be of a very serious nature and permanent. It may look like the advertising has increased the claims being made, but it is just the opposite. After all, it is well within a lawyer’s right to hold off on payment until a settlement is one. It is also acceptable to absorb the costs of litigation if a client should lose.

To understand more about personal injury solicitors visit this resource. As a person looking for personal injury lawyer you should visit that site.

Collection Law: The Good, The Bad And The Profitable

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This manual is designed for individuals who find themselves responsible for the collection law. Readers will come away from this manual with a better understanding of how Ohio law and the legal system work. You will come away from this manual with the knowledge to ensure that as a creditor, all your rights are adequately protected.

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Its been said that collection work is like housepainting anyone can do it. Thats true; anyone can do it, but to do it properly, one must know more than the raw mechanics. The chances are good that your client isnt your debtors only creditor, and part of the magic of successful collection work is making sure that your client is the one among many whom the debtor actually pays.

Our speakers have experience in debtor/creditor matters and have successfully collected debts, where others have tried

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Cool Just Filed Lawsuits images

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Roddy McDowall, Richard Burton, Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Roddy McDowall, Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

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Martin Landau, Richard Burton, Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).