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Some cool filed lawsuits images:

Forest Haven
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Image by Jack Parrott
FH was a children’s developmental center and mental institution in Laurel, Maryland.

It was notorious for its poor conditions and abuse of patients. It opened its doors in 1925, and was shut down in 1991 by a federal court. There have since been numerous civil and class-action lawsuits involving patients and employees

During the early years, it was considered a state of the art facility. With a good reputation, this hospital set the standard for other states to follow. With declining conditions decades later, many patients filed lawsuits against the hospital for reasons of abuse, neglect, poor living conditions — even medical testing. A small morgue was all that stood between the patients and a cemetery on site where graves had been repeatedly uncovered by erosion.

Chicago (ILL) Downtown, S Wabash Ave, ” CNA Center ” 1972.
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Image by (vincent desjardins)
CNA Center is a 600-foot (183 m), 44-story high-rise building located at 333 South Wabash Avenue in Chicago.

description :

CNA Center is a simple, rectangular International Style building, but it is unique in that the entire building is painted bright red, turning an otherwise ordinary-looking structure into one of the most eye-catching buildings in the city. It was designed by the firm of Graham, Anderson, Probst & White and was completed in 1972. The red design was used to depict the sun setting over the ocean as illustrated by the red imagery to the west of Lake Michigan.

HISTORY :

Originally known as Continental Center III (in reference to the original moniker of CNA Financial Corporation, Continental National American Group, both CNA Center (formerly CNA Plaza) and the neighboring CNA Center North (Continental Center II, built in 1962) adjoined and were painted red. The shorter red building was later restored to its original gray tone. The two buildings remain joined at the second floor: CNA’s Conference Center uses space on that floor, but all entrance and egress to it is through CNA Center.

In 1999, a large fragment of a window fell from the building and killed a woman walking with her child. CNA Financial, a property insurance company, later paid million to settle the resultant lawsuit. All the buildings windows were replaced in an expensive retrofit. To this day, the firm physically checks each window monthly. Many other building owners in Chicago checked their windows for soundness, leading to a flurry of repairs and replacements.Utilizing a combination of lights on/off and 1,600 window blinds open/closed (and sometimes foamboard cutouts), the windows on CNA Center are often used to display lighted window messages, typically denoting holidays, remembrances, and other events denoting Chicago civic pride, such as when the White Sox played in and won the 2005 World Series. A computer program is used to calculate which windows need to be activated to create the proper message.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cna_gobears.jpg

IMPORTANT :
All 3000 windows were replaced in the CNA center after the 1999 death of a pedestrian from falling glass. investigators found that the former was not suited to the building’s thermal expansion.

George Cleeve statue (Founder of Portland, Maine – 1633) – detail
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Image by origamidon
Eastern Prom Trail, Portland, Maine USA • Carved into the base: George Cleeve // b. 1586 Somersetshire, England. d. by 1671 Portland (Falmouth), Maine. He relied on persuasion by words not the sword. // Deputy Pres. of Lygonia 1647-1658. // Founder of Portland, Maine 1633.

This statue is modeled after one of Portland’s founders, George Cleeve, and it stands along the Eastern Waterfront. The statue happens to be standing on land belong to Portland Yacht Services, a business that is owned by a descendent of Cleeve. … this statue caused some controversy back when it was offered to the city in 2002. It was not accepted by the city due to the possibility that Cleeve had owned slaves. So despite not being a piece of public art and being located on private land, when the Portland Yacht Services is open during the day you can stop in for a glimpse of the statue that they found a place for. – From the website of Portland Daily Photo.

A statue of the founder of Portland, Maine, will go up after all, despite protests from city officials and others that the man is unworthy of memorializing because he may have owned a slave nearly 400 years ago, reports the Portland Press Herald.

But instead of going on city property, the seven-foot likeness of George Cleeve will go on private property owned by a descendant of the man who settled Portland around 1633. Initially, the ,000 statue — donated to the city by a private group [the George Cleeve Association; and commissioned and donated to the association by John Threlfall of Madison, Wisconsin, a Cleeve descendant.] — was to be installed at the Maine State Pier, but officials changed their mind when word leaked that Cleeve had a servant named Oliver Weeks who may have been a slave. Credible evidence that Weeks was black or a slave never surfaced.

The city’s Public Art Committee said the city should "respectfully decline" the statue because, in part, it wanted to avoid offending African-Americans who have long been excluded from Eurocentric, white-male accounts of U.S. history. – From a report in 1962.

• Some more history: Born in 1586, Cleeve arrived on the coast of Maine in 1630. He settled first in Cape Elizabeth, then known as Spurwink, with his wife, Joan, and daughter, Elizabeth. He immediately formed a partnership with Richard Tucker, who was already there when Cleeve arrived. Confusion over land title forced Cleeve and Tucker to leave Cape Elizabeth in 1633 and resettle on the nearby peninsula that is now Portland. Cleeve built a house at Clay Cove, between what would become India Street and the Casco Bay ferry terminal. The two men went back to England in 1636 and returned with the title to Machigonne Point. The area became Casco in the 1640s and was absorbed by the larger Falmouth land grant in 1658.

Little is known about Tucker. One letter from the era describes him as Cleeve’s servant before he moved in 1646 to Portsmouth and later became a selectman, according to the "Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire." More is known about Cleeve, in large part because he headed the regional government assembly for a time. He also regularly used the colonial court system, filing numerous deeds and lawsuits and eventually serving as a court officer.

Cleeve lived in Falmouth for the rest of his life, until he died around 1666, impoverished and still waging court battles. His descendants, who call themselves Cleevies, trace their heritage through the centuries to Cleeve’s daughter and son-in-law, Michael Mitton, who had five daughters and one son.

Cleeve and Tucker already have a monument, a 17-foot-tall granite obelisk erected in 1883 on the Eastern Promenade, at the beginning of Congress Street. But Cleeve Association members say the obelisk isn’t enough because it fails to reflect Cleeve’s era. They say their ancestor should be recognized as the sole founder of Portland because he stayed on and became the first political leader of the region. – From Portland Press Herald Writer Kelley Bouchard, January 14, 2002.

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