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Erin Brockovich
filed lawsuits
Image by Eva Rinaldi Celebrity and Live Music Photographer
Erin Brockovich Legal Eagle And Environmentalist Speaks At University of Sydney

Erin Brockovich, legal eagle and environmentalist spoke at the the University of Sydney earlier this evening.

I was delighted to attend, meet and photograph this extraordinary woman.

The Lecture…

Distinguished Speakers Program: Erin Brockovich

Paying it forward – Erin Brockovich 12 years on…

The Erin Brockovich phenomenon as born from its movie beginnings and consolidated by years of environmental advocacy is as strongly identified in Australia today as when the iconic movie was released in 2000. In a case that went on to become a Hollywood movie Erin spearheaded a legal battle that led to the largest legal settlement in US history for a toxic tort involving 600 residents.

In the lecture, Erin shared her unique experiences over the past twelve years and looks forward to the next twelve.

Now a successful author, international speaker and award winner Erin dedicates her time to advising several law firms in the US and exclusively to Shine Lawyers in Australia. For over 18 years she has continued to crusade for the rights of people and protection of the environment.

The lecture was presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012.

Erin Brockovich Biography…

Say the name Erin Brockovich and you think, strong, tough, stubborn and sexy. Erin is all that and definitely more.

She is a modern-day “David” who loves a good brawl with today’s “Goliaths”.

She thrives on being the voice for those who don’t know how to yell.

She is a rebel. She is a fighter. She is a mother. She is a woman. She is you and me.

It’s been 10 years since Julia Roberts starred in the Oscar-winning tour de force “Erin Brockovich”. The film turned an unknown legal researcher into a 20th century icon by showcasing how her dogged persistence was the impelling force behind the largest medical settlement lawsuit in history. Since then, Erin hasn’t been resting on her laurels… she continues to fight hard and win big!

This gutsy broad doesn’t apologize for who she is. She has always loved going head to head with the big boys and was never intimated by their bravado. She learned how to come out on top from her tight-knit mid-western family in Lawrence, Kansas. Erin was the youngest child of an industrial engineer father and journalist mother. Her parents always believed that she could do anything she set her mind to if she learned to focus her amazing energy.

After a few years roaming around at various colleges, Erin decided that she wanted to be a California girl. She first landed a job as a management trainee for K-Mart but when that didn’t make her swagger, she decided to study electrical engineering. But that wasn’t enough for the Kansas beauty… on a fluke, she entered the Miss Pacific Coast beauty pageant… and, not surprising, won the title.

When she realized that beauty pageants weren’t her thing, Erin, her husband and two children settled in Reno, Nevada. After divorcing, the single mother became a secretary at a brokerage firm where she met and married her second husband. But that marriage was short lived and the now mother of three was solo again.

Up until this point, Erin was the average divorced single mother trying to make a living… until she crossed paths with lawyer, Ed Masry, and changed the course of both their lives.

After being seriously injured in a traffic accident in Reno, Erin moved back to California’s San Fernando Valley, and hired Masry & Vititoe to represent her. They won a small settlement but she still needed work so she got a job at their law firm as a file clerk, it was while organizing papers on a pro bono real estate case that Erin first found medical records that would explode into the largest direct action lawsuit in US history.

Erin’s exhaustive investigation uncovered that Pacific Gas & Electric had been poisoning the small town of Hinkley’s Water for over 30 years. It was because of Erin’s unwavering tenacity that PG & E had been exposed for leaking toxic Chromium 6 into the ground water. This poison affected the health of the population of Hinkley. In 1996, as a result of the largest direct action lawsuit of its kind, spear-headed by Erin and Ed Masry, the utility giant was forced to pay out the largest toxic tort injury settlement in US history: 3 million in damages to more than 600 Hinkley residents.

The story and eventual film helped make the “Erin Brockovich” a household name. Over time, Erin realized that she could use her notoriety to spread positive messages of personal empowerment and to encourage others to stand up and make a difference.

Erin Brockovich has conquered all forms of media… Her first TV project was ABC’s 2001 special “Challenge America With Erin Brockovich” where she helped motivate and organize the rebuilding of a dilapidated park in downtown Manhattan. This show is best described as “Extreme Make-Over Home Edition” on steroids.

Then, for three seasons, Erin hosted the Lifetime series, “Final Justice With Erin Brockovich”. The show celebrated everyday women who triumphed when faced with overwhelming adversity.

Erin then dominated the world of publishing with her New York Times Business best-seller, “Take It From Me. Life’s A Struggle, But You Can Win”.

Because of her fighting spirit, Erin has become the champion of countless women and men. She is this generations, “Dear Abby” and in fact receives thousands of “Dear Erin” letters and emails each year from people who are begging for help and support in their own personal struggles. Erin proudly answers every one of them.

As President of Brockovich Research & Consulting, she is currently involved in numerous environmental projects worldwide.

Erin is one of the most requested speakers on the international lecture circuit and travels the world for personal appearances.

Erin Brockovich is a true American hero who’s icon status and “stick-to-it-iveness” only fuels her determination to expose injustice and lend her voice to those who do not have one.

She has requests for her help in ground water contamination complaints in every state of the US, Australia and other international hot spots. She is currently working on cases in California, Texas, Florida, Michigan, Illinois and Missouri.

Erin lives in Southern California with her husband, three children and 5 Pomeranians and admits to one guilty pleasure… shopping (Credit: Erin Brockovich)

Websites

Erin Brockovich official website
www.brockovich.com

The University of Sydney
www.sydney.edu.au

Shine Lawyers
www.shine.com.au

Eva Rinaldi Photography Flickr
www.flickr.com/evarinaldiphotography

Eva Rinaldi Photography
www.evarinaldi.com

Lawsuit Filed Against Disney Over ‘Zootopia’ Movie

Lawsuit Filed Against Disney Over 'Zootopia' Movie

According to the claim of a new lawsuit, Disney’s smash hit animated film ‘Zootopia’ is a rip-off. In the suit, which was filed Tuesday in California, writer Gary Goldman’s Esplanade Productions claims that Goldman pitched the idea for a “Zootopia” franchise in the years 2000 and 2009, but was rejected. The suit reads, “Mr. Goldman provided a treatment, a synopsis, character descriptions, character illustrations, and other materials.” It then adds, “He even provided a title for the franchise: ‘Zootopia.’ Instead of lawfully acquiring Goldman’s work, Defendants said they were not interested in producing it and sent him on his way.”
http://www.sfgate.com/entertainment/the-wrap/article/Disney-Hit-With-Copyright-Lawsuit-Over-11017592.php

Home

This video was produced by YT Wochit Entertainment using http://wochit.com

NFL Lawsuit Filed Over Head Injuries: Junior Seau's Death Revisited

Former football players accuse league of covering up health risks. For more, click here: http://abcnews.go.com/US/nfl-players-file-lawsuit-league-concussions/story?id=16514359
Video Rating: / 5

Elizabeth Taylor, Cleopatra (1963)

Some cool just filed lawsuits images:

Elizabeth Taylor, Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Elizabeth Taylor, Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Rex Harrison, George Cole (background, right), Cleopatra (1963)
just filed lawsuits
Image by classic_film
Synopsis, via IMDb:
Historical epic. The triumphs and tragedy of the Egyptian queen, Cleopatra.

The lengthy Egyptian/Roman historic/romantic/war epic had it all: lavish scenery (long before CGI effects were in use), gorgeous costumes (Irene Sharaff won an Oscar for designing Elizabeth Taylor’s film wardrobe), and a huge cast, which included Taylor as the title character (February 27, 1932 – March 23, 2011), Rex Harrison (March 5, 1908 – June 2, 1990), Richard Burton (November 10, 1925 – August 5, 1984), Martin Landau (b. June 20, 1928), Roddy McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998), Hume Cronyn (July 18, 1911 – June 15, 2003), Kenneth Haigh (b. March 25, 1931), George Cole (April 22, 1925 – August 5, 2015), Andrew Keir (April 3, 1926 – October 5, 1997), Isabel Cooley (July 20, 1924 – January 3, 2000), Cesare Danova (March 1, 1926 – March 19, 1992), and many others. Academy Award-winning dance director Hermes Pan did the choreography.

There has been much debate as to where this Twentieth Century-Fox film stands/stood as a box office blockbuster or a financial bust — while "Cleopatra" cost more at that time than any other Hollywood film had (some sources say it cost million to produce, others say or million), it eventually recouped its expenses. It was the top-grossing film of 1963, but because it cost so much to produce (partially because so many extras were used on location and because production had to be shut down for six months due to Taylor’s near-death illness), "Cleopatra" was in the red for several years.

Rex Harrison won the National Board of Review award for his performance as Julius Caesar and was nominated for a Best Actor Oscar. The film was nominated for nine Oscars and of those, won four. The press went wild over the scandalous love affair that developed during filming between co-stars Taylor and Burton.

More "Cleopatra" film trivia, via IMDb:
Joseph L. Mankiewicz hoped that the film would be released as two separate pictures, "Caesar and Cleopatra" followed by "Antony and Cleopatra." Each was to run approximately three hours. 20th Century-Fox decided against this, and released the film we know today. It runs just over four hours. It is hoped that the missing two hours will be located and that one day a six-hour ‘director’s cut’ will be available.
 
During the early filming at Pinewood Studios, the harsh weather conditions of the English winter brought on pneumonia for the fragile Elizabeth Taylor. After a day at the set in which she had to be carried on and off because she was so weak, Taylor eventually collapsed in her hotel room at the Dorchester. The private doctor of Queen Elizabeth II was summoned to her hotel room. According to Taylor, he apparently shook her violently like a rag doll and pounded on her rib cage, provoking no consciousness within her. She was given an hour to live and was said to be in a coma. An emergency tracheotomy was performed successfully at the hospital and Taylor slowly recovered (the scar can be seen in different scenes of the film). Her presence was required for almost every scene, so production closed down. Director Rouben Mamoulian finally resigned on January 3, 1961. He was followed by Peter Finch and Stephen Boyd, who had to honor prior commitments. Filming proceeded a few months later, this time in Rome’s hot climate.
 
With the scandal surrounding the affair between Burton and Taylor, scant attention was paid to Rex Harrison. He got the last laugh when he became the only one of the film’s three stars to receive an Oscar nomination for his performance. While filming the sea battle in Iscua, a producer invited Burton and Taylor for lunch on his yacht and placed hidden cameras in their room, in the hope of capturing and then selling pictures of them kissing. Taylor spotted the cameras immediately and Burton had to be restrained from attacking the host.
 
During the scene in which Cleopatra makes her entrance into Rome, Taylor’s life had been threatened, after the Vatican had denounced her scandalous relationship with Burton, by the thousands of Roman Catholics that were the extras. Soldiers packing guns lined the streets with barriers and cables to try and prevent an assassination. As Taylor came through the arch, the crowd broke through the barriers and cables all at once. But as Elizabeth and the film crew feared for her life, she realized that they were shouting "Boccia Liz! Boccia Liz!," declaring their love for the actress. Instead of remaining in the highly strung character of Cleopatra, Taylor began to cry and thank the crowd as she blew kisses. The scene had to be re-shot because of this.
 
In Anzio, while building the Alexandria set, a few construction workers were killed by an unexploded mine left over from World War II.
 
Taylor’s contract stipulated that her million-dollar salary be paid out as follows: 5,000 for 16 weeks work plus ,000 a week afterwards plus 10% of the gross (with no break-even point). When the film was restarted in Rome in 1961, she had earned well over million. After a lengthy million lawsuit brought against Taylor and Richard Burton by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and a countersuit filed by Taylor, the studio finally settled with the actress in 1966. Her ultimate take for the film was million.
 
When the film was cut from six hours to four, 49 pages of re-shoots were required to make sense of the changes.
 
In the four-hour version, Cleopatra takes Appolodorus as her occasional lover, but these scenes were eliminated in the 194-minute version. Joseph L. Mankiewicz originally wanted black actor James Edwards as Apollodorus and encouraged the actor to physically get in shape for the role. Unfortunately Fox executives were not comfortable with the relationship between him and Cleopatra, so he was replaced by Cesare Danova.
 
Richard Burton and Roddy McDowall took supporting roles in Fox’s "The Longest Day" (1962) purely to relieve the boredom of this film’s production.
 
At the time, all Italian films were dubbed in post-production. Carpenters constantly hammered on the set during filming. Joseph L. Mankiewicz spent hours trying to make it clear to the Italian crew that silence was required on set at all times.
 
Cleopatra’s barge alone cost about million in today’s dollars.
 
Joan Collins, Brigitte Bardot, Jennifer Jones, Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren, Shirley MacLaine, Dolores Michaels, Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Sue Parker, Millie Perkins, Barbara Steele, Joanne Woodward, and Dana Wynter were considered to play Cleopatra. Yul Brynner, Cary Grant, Curd Jürgens, Fredric March, Noël Coward, John Gielgud, and Peter Sellers were considered for Julius Caesar.
 
The film is widely regarded as one of the biggest flops of all time. It was actually one of the highest grossing films of the 1960s. Once it opened, it was was sold out for the next four months. In 1966, ABC-TV paid 20th Century-Fox a record million for two showings of the film, a deal that put the film in the black.
 
The budget for Elizabeth Taylor’s costumes, 4,800, was the highest ever for a single screen actor. Her 65 costumes included a dress made from 24-carat gold cloth.
 
A group of female extras who played Cleopatra’s servants and slave girls went on strike to demand protection from amorous Italian male extras. The studio eventually hired a special guard to protect the female extras.
 
The Roman forum built at Cinecitta was three times the size of the real thing.
 
According to Rex Harrison’s autobiography, Twentieth Century-Fox custom-made his Julius Caesar boots while Richard Burton’s boots were hand-me-downs from the previous attempt at making the film. Harrison was amazed that Burton did not complain.
 
After long days of shooting, Joseph L. Mankiewicz would retire to his private rooms to do rewrites. He initially begged for time off to do a proper rewrite, but Twentieth Century Fox was so deeply in debt that they couldn’t allow for yet another delay in production. Mankiewicz resorted to daily injections to keep him going during the day, and different ones at night to help him sleep.
 

************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

George Soros Group Sues Alex Jones Infowars

A law firm with close ties to George Soros has filed a lawsuit against Alex Jones and Infowars. What does it mean? Alex breaks it down.

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BREAKING NEWS! AN ETHICS LAWSUIT HAS BEEN FILED AGAINST PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP!

https://www.youtube.com/shared?ci=OoRrNQ0l368

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Cool Just Filed Lawsuits images

Some cool just filed lawsuits images:

Case 1 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
just filed lawsuits
Image by W&M Libraries
Shown here is an image of Case 1 from the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this case:

Brown v. Board of Education, 1954:

The students and parents of Farmville’s Moton High School worked with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in suing the school board of Prince Edward County. The NAACP previously had sought to force school boards to make black schools equal to white ones, but in 1950 it had changed its strategy to try to overturn segregation as unconstitutional. It was involved in cases all over the country, not just in Virginia. The Supreme Court bundled four of the cases, including the Farmville case, together into Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Thurgood Marshall and other NAACP lawyers argued before the Court that segregation violated the “equal protection” clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. constitution. Based on tests showing that black children preferred white dolls over black dolls, they also argued that mandatory segregation psychologically damaged children of color, making them internalize feelings of racial inferiority.

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled in the Brown case that “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” Chief Justice Earl Warren, pictured here speaking at William & Mary later that year, worked hard to get a unanimous decision and became the target of white Southerners’ worst venom. In May 1955, in Brown II, the Supreme Court ordered that desegregation proceed “with all deliberate speed” but left supervision of the task to federal district courts.

The photograph of Moton High’s Class of 1956 visibly demonstrates that desegregation did not happen overnight. The school was just as segregated in 1956 as the schools attended by class sponsor Mabel Ragsdale Watson and her sister Laura Ragsdale when they were school girls in Roanoke decades earlier, as seen in Laura’s photo album.

The Gray Commission, 1954-1955:

The Brown decision stunned Virginia’s leaders. At first, they seemed willing to accept the Court’s ruling, but angry newspaper editors and white voters called for resistance. Governor Thomas Stanley then appointed a commission, chaired by State Senator Garland Gray and consisting entirely of white legislators, to determine how to respond. In November 1955, the Gray Commission issued recommendations designed to delay desegregation but allow localities to decide if they would desegregate quickly or not. Among other proposals, the Gray plan recommended giving tuition vouchers so parents could send their children to segregated private schools. The assembly quickly adopted the Gray Commission report in principle. Since the state constitution did not allow public money to be used for private schools, it needed to be amended for tuition vouchers to be possible. A referendum on January 9, 1956 overwhelmingly approved calling a constitutional convention which did just that.

Massive Resistance, 1956-1957:

In response to Brown II, the Arlington County School Board announced in late 1955 that it would gradually integrate. The NAACP helped parents and students file lawsuits to force integration elsewhere in Virginia. Ardent segregationists, fearing that integration anywhere
could lead to integration everywhere, demanded stronger resistance to Brown. Nowhere was resistance greater than among the white population of Southside, the most heavily black region in Virginia. Southside was the heart of the Byrd Organization, the Democratic machine that had run the state since the 1920s under the leadership of U.S. Senator Harry F. Byrd, pictured here with Republican State Senator Ted Dalton. In February 1956, Byrd proposed a program of “massive resistance” to school integration. Byrd supported the Virginia assembly’s resolution of “interposition” that declared the Brown decision unconstitutional and unenforceable, although this had no actual legal effect. More importantly, in September 1956, the assembly passed a program of massive resistance laws, known as the Stanley Plan after the governor. The plan denied state aid to any locality that allowed desegregation of even one school, authorized the governor to close any school that federal courts ordered integrated, and provided tuition grants to help white parents send their children to segregated private schools if their local public school closed.

School Closings, 1959:

The Stanley Plan met with immediate challenges in federal courts, with cases pending through 1957 and into 1958. As the school year began in the fall of 1958, federal judges ordered previously all-white schools in Warren County, Charlottesville, and Norfolk to integrate. Governor J. Lindsay Almond, Jr. shut the schools down rather than allowing them to integrate. In November, Norfolk voters voted against petitioning the governor to reopen the city schools, even though the closing affected 10,000 white students and seventeen black students. On January 19, 1959, the state supreme court ruled that the closings violated the state constitution’s provision requiring there to be public schools and the federal district court ruled that the closings violated the Fourteenth Amendment’s equal protection clause. The courts ordered that the schools be reopened.

Prince Edward County, 1959-1964 and Beyond:

After briefly considering shutting the state’s public schools down entirely, Governor Almond conceded defeat and reluctantly allowed integration to proceed very slowly. The more extreme segregationists denounced Almond as a traitor. The state legislature once again adopted a local-option plan, with tuition grants and a pupil placement program that allowed students to be assigned to schools in ways that minimized “race mixing.” The county government in Prince Edward County, in the heart of Southside, shut down its public school system entirely. Using state tuition grants, many white students attended a new private academy, but other white students and all the students of color were left without formal schooling unless they left the county. The Supreme Court in 1964 ordered Prince Edward to reopen its public schools. At that point, only five percent of African American students statewide attended integrated schools.

In 1968, the Supreme Court invalidated the pupil-placement program and ordered an end to separate white and black school systems in a decision involving New Kent County. And in 1970, a federal judge ordered a busing plan implemented to desegregate Richmond schools. Not until the late 1980s did busing end.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Label from Case 1 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
just filed lawsuits
Image by W&M Libraries
Shown here is a label from Case 1 of the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this case:

Brown v. Board of Education, 1954:

The students and parents of Farmville’s Moton High School worked with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in suing the school board of Prince Edward County. The NAACP previously had sought to force school boards to make black schools equal to white ones, but in 1950 it had changed its strategy to try to overturn segregation as unconstitutional. It was involved in cases all over the country, not just in Virginia. The Supreme Court bundled four of the cases, including the Farmville case, together into Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Thurgood Marshall and other NAACP lawyers argued before the Court that segregation violated the “equal protection” clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. constitution. Based on tests showing that black children preferred white dolls over black dolls, they also argued that mandatory segregation psychologically damaged children of color, making them internalize feelings of racial inferiority.

On May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court ruled in the Brown case that “separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” Chief Justice Earl Warren, pictured here speaking at William & Mary later that year, worked hard to get a unanimous decision and became the target of white Southerners’ worst venom. In May 1955, in Brown II, the Supreme Court ordered that desegregation proceed “with all deliberate speed” but left supervision of the task to federal district courts.

The photograph of Moton High’s Class of 1956 visibly demonstrates that desegregation did not happen overnight. The school was just as segregated in 1956 as the schools attended by class sponsor Mabel Ragsdale Watson and her sister Laura Ragsdale when they were school girls in Roanoke decades earlier, as seen in Laura’s photo album.

The Gray Commission, 1954-1955:

The Brown decision stunned Virginia’s leaders. At first, they seemed willing to accept the Court’s ruling, but angry newspaper editors and white voters called for resistance. Governor Thomas Stanley then appointed a commission, chaired by State Senator Garland Gray and consisting entirely of white legislators, to determine how to respond. In November 1955, the Gray Commission issued recommendations designed to delay desegregation but allow localities to decide if they would desegregate quickly or not. Among other proposals, the Gray plan recommended giving tuition vouchers so parents could send their children to segregated private schools. The assembly quickly adopted the Gray Commission report in principle. Since the state constitution did not allow public money to be used for private schools, it needed to be amended for tuition vouchers to be possible. A referendum on January 9, 1956 overwhelmingly approved calling a constitutional convention which did just that.

Massive Resistance, 1956-1957:

In response to Brown II, the Arlington County School Board announced in late 1955 that it would gradually integrate. The NAACP helped parents and students file lawsuits to force integration elsewhere in Virginia. Ardent segregationists, fearing that integration anywhere
could lead to integration everywhere, demanded stronger resistance to Brown. Nowhere was resistance greater than among the white population of Southside, the most heavily black region in Virginia. Southside was the heart of the Byrd Organization, the Democratic machine that had run the state since the 1920s under the leadership of U.S. Senator Harry F. Byrd, pictured here with Republican State Senator Ted Dalton. In February 1956, Byrd proposed a program of “massive resistance” to school integration. Byrd supported the Virginia assembly’s resolution of “interposition” that declared the Brown decision unconstitutional and unenforceable, although this had no actual legal effect. More importantly, in September 1956, the assembly passed a program of massive resistance laws, known as the Stanley Plan after the governor. The plan denied state aid to any locality that allowed desegregation of even one school, authorized the governor to close any school that federal courts ordered integrated, and provided tuition grants to help white parents send their children to segregated private schools if their local public school closed.

School Closings, 1959:

The Stanley Plan met with immediate challenges in federal courts, with cases pending through 1957 and into 1958. As the school year began in the fall of 1958, federal judges ordered previously all-white schools in Warren County, Charlottesville, and Norfolk to integrate. Governor J. Lindsay Almond, Jr. shut the schools down rather than allowing them to integrate. In November, Norfolk voters voted against petitioning the governor to reopen the city schools, even though the closing affected 10,000 white students and seventeen black students. On January 19, 1959, the state supreme court ruled that the closings violated the state constitution’s provision requiring there to be public schools and the federal district court ruled that the closings violated the Fourteenth Amendment’s equal protection clause. The courts ordered that the schools be reopened.

Prince Edward County, 1959-1964 and Beyond:

After briefly considering shutting the state’s public schools down entirely, Governor Almond conceded defeat and reluctantly allowed integration to proceed very slowly. The more extreme segregationists denounced Almond as a traitor. The state legislature once again adopted a local-option plan, with tuition grants and a pupil placement program that allowed students to be assigned to schools in ways that minimized “race mixing.” The county government in Prince Edward County, in the heart of Southside, shut down its public school system entirely. Using state tuition grants, many white students attended a new private academy, but other white students and all the students of color were left without formal schooling unless they left the county. The Supreme Court in 1964 ordered Prince Edward to reopen its public schools. At that point, only five percent of African American students statewide attended integrated schools.

In 1968, the Supreme Court invalidated the pupil-placement program and ordered an end to separate white and black school systems in a decision involving New Kent County. And in 1970, a federal judge ordered a busing plan implemented to desegregate Richmond schools. Not until the late 1980s did busing end.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

IT’S OFFICIAL: Snap just filed for its IPO

It’s official: The company behind Snapchat and Spectacles goes public. Snap is expected to go public at a valuation north of billion in early March, making it not only the first tech IPO of the year but also one of the largest in a while. The company hopes to raise billion and says it has 158 million daily active users. The Los Angeles-based company said it generated 4.5 million in sales in 2016, up from .7 million in 2015. It had a net loss of 4.6 million in 2016, up from a net loss of 2.9 million in 2015.

Defamation lawsuit filed on behalf of Trump accuser

Attorney Gloria Allred announces she filed a defamation lawsuit against President-elect Donald Trump on behalf of Summer Zervos, who claims Trump subjected her to unwanted sexual touching. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

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Nice Filed Lawsuit photos

A few nice filed lawsuit images I found:

Parti Gras 12
filed lawsuit
Image by Anonymous9000
Parti Gras ’09 on February 21st in Clearwater, Florida. Awesome Xenu helm complete with flying saucer and psyche drugs.

As part of the 13th straight month of protests in over 50 cities around the world, Anonymous marched in what the scientology CULT calls it’s "Mecca". With a free concert downtown, many locals were drawn to the area and public support was overwhelming. Many LULZ were had and many Parti Gras beads with small fliers attached were given

Last week the mother of Kyle Brennan filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the cult and three of it’s members, one being the sister of the cult leader, David Miscavige. Kyle wasn’t a scientologist, but unfortunately for him his father was and Kyle died in Clearwater.

Front page newspaper article: www.tampabay.com/news/article976561.ece

Horrific PDF of court filing: www.tampabay.com/specials/2009/PDFs/Scientology.pdf

All faces of those unmasked are blurred to protect them from the cult’s "Fair Game" policy of harassing it’s critics. These are brave people of all ages and walks of life, standing shoulder to shoulder with ex-Scientologists to bring the truth TO YOU.

But don’t take my word for it, educate yourself about what TIME Magazine called "The Cult of Greed and Power":
www.whyweprotest.net
www.xenu.net
www.exscientologykids.com

Cool Filing Lawsuits images

A few nice filing lawsuits images I found:

JESI913
filing lawsuits
Image by BROOKE MCKINNEY PHOTOGRAPHY
These images have a copyright on them. You may download them and post them as long as you do not edit them , as long as you give credit to the photographer (Brooke Mckinney Photography), and as long as you do not print them, sale them, or make any financial gain off of them . Also, do not under any circumstances try to take credit for them or we do reserve the right to file a lawsuit.